The process of making bone handles 

 

I use a lot of cow and horse bone when I can find it. I prefer ageed bone. By that I mean bone that has been laying out in someones pasture for years. I study a piece of bone real carefully to make sure I can get the most out of the piece of bone with as little waste as possible. “Waste not want not.”

 

The next step is the dyeing of the bone. I place the bone in a jar of dye containing the primary color.  This is kept under a heat lamp which helps the dye penetrate the material. After leaving the bone in the dye overnight, I take it to check the tone and the saturation, then it has to dry overnight.

 

After the bone is absolutely dry (usually a day later) I put the bone back into the secondary color of dye.  After several hours to a day, I pull the piece bone out the dye to check for the final color and let it dry again for another day.

 

In some cases I will put the bones into a third color of dye.